The Women in Health Science Working Committee was established to gain a better understanding of the issues that women researchers face in health and medical research and barriers to career progression.

The NHMRC Women in Health Science Working Committee was established to gain a better understanding of the issues that women researchers face in health and medical research and barriers to career progression. The Committee provides advice directly to NHMRC’s CEO, Professor Anne Kelso AO on strategies that could be implemented to address issues and overcome barriers.

Recent activities

NHMRC has reappointed the Women in Health Science Committee for the 2018–2021 triennium. Current members of the Committee are listed below. Membership includes male and female researchers at different career stages and those with and without children.

The newly reappointed Women in Health Science Committee (WiHS) met on 29 November 2018 and:

  • welcomed new members, Mr David Rae and Dr Sandip Kamath
  • discussed with NHMRC CEO Professor Kelso the activities for WiHS’s attention this triennium
  • commenced work on its 2018-2021 workplan, and
  • discussed the release of NHMRC’s Gender Equality Strategy 2018-2021.

Chair,
Professor
Rosalie
Viney

University of Technology Sydney.

Associate Professor
Nikola
Bowden

Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle

Professor
Geoffrey
Faulkner

Mater Research Institute, The University of Queensland.

Professor
Dawn
Freshwater

The University of Western Australia

Professor
Caroline
Homer
AO

University of Technology Sydney.

Dr
Sandip
Kamath

James Cook University

Professor
Peter
Koopman

Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

Associate Professor
Suzanne
Miller

Monash University

Mr
David
Rae

The University of Sydney

Professor
Deborah
White

South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute

Professor
Robert
Williamson AO

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, University of Melbourne.

Professor
Tania
Winzenberg

Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania