Highlights

Reconciliation Week 2016

The artwork communicates empowerment of people over their health, the progression of learning and knowledge out from the meeting place (NHMRC - bottom left corner), where many people are gathered. In the streams are the sources of nutrition and health - ants, berry bush and fish, as well as stars which symbolise new ideas. 

NHMRC is proud to acknowledge Reconciliation Week 2016.  We remain committed to reconciliation: building respect, relationships and understanding between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and other Australians to close the gap in health and wellbeing outcomes.

Our vision for reconciliation is to positively influence health inequality between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians.  Many NHMRC-funded researchers are making a valuable contribution towards addressing this health disadvantage that Indigenous Australians face.

We have a long history of working to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 

In 2002, NHMRC made a landmark commitment to direct at least five per cent of our research funding to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.  We maintain and exceed this commitment today.

Since 2003, the NHMRC Road Map: a strategic framework for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health through research has been NHMRC’s policy framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, ethics and advice.  Road Map II was launched in 2010. 

In 2016, NHMRC’s Principal Committee Indigenous Caucus is helping us to develop Road Map III to articulate and drive the next stage of our strategy to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health through research.

Read the message from NHMRC CEO, Professor Anne Kelso, for Reconciliation Week 2016.