Podcasts

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Monday, 14 December 2009 - 1:50pm

Research: the excitement and the challenges

Associate Professor Marc Achen and Associate Professor Steven Stacker 11 December 2009 Chief investigators at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research reveal the excitement and challenges in their work of trying to understand why and how cancer spreads. Associate Professor Marc Achen feels the most exciting parts of his job are making new discoveries and helping people. His colleague, Associate Professor...

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Wednesday, 2 December 2009 - 11:07am

What will you do with your life?

Dr Julia Pitcher 26 November 2009 How many young people expect when they finish high school they should know what to do with the rest of their lives? Dr Julia Pitcher, whose team is investigating the effects of premature birth on children as they grow older, says that sort of expectation about life planning is unrealistic. Here she tells Dr Andi Horvath how it took her 20 years to go from high school to her postdoctoral training and that it...

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Tuesday, 1 December 2009 - 12:09pm

International leaders in health research seminar

Three speakers from a seminar on 29 January 2008. Please note these podcasts are large files and may take some time to download. International leaders in health research seminar Professor Edward Holmes Professor Edward Holmes is the Executive Chairman, National Medical Research Council, Singapore. In this vodcast, he talks about the opportunities for collaboration in the Asia Pacific Region. Video file (Windows Media Video, 12.6MB)...

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Tuesday, 1 December 2009 - 11:07am

Occasional series

Podcasts produced by NHMRC in the Occasional series are listed below. Please note these podcasts are large files and may take some time to download. Occasional series podcasts — 2009 Professor James Best on conflict of interest 6 Aug 2009 A pharmaceutical company offers to fund your biomedical research project, but may have a vested interest in your findings. What should you do? Refuse the offer on principle? Take the money? But then, how do you manage your situation...

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Monday, 30 November 2009 - 11:58am

10 of the best research projects 2008

The 10 of the best research projects 2008 series of podcasts celebrates success stories from ten of Australia's leading health and medical research teams, whose work has been funded by NHMRC. These conversations are representative of hundreds of highly successful and intenrational-standard projects funded each year by NHRMC. Please note these podcasts are large files and may take some time to download. in this series Dr Timothy Rayner 9 July 2009 When Cleopatra bathed in milk, could...

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Friday, 20 November 2009 - 2:09pm

Killing cancer without collateral damage

Associate Professor Roger Martin 12 November 2009 A new technique in the fight against cancer targets radioactive atoms to tumour cells without damaging adjacent normal cells. Associate Professor Roger Martin and his team are developing and refining that technique at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Here he tells Dr Andi Horvath about the motivation that comes from researching in a hospital environment. He also explains how studying...

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Friday, 6 November 2009 - 2:24pm

10 of the Best Research Projects 2009

The 10 of the Best Research Projects 2009 series of podcasts celebrates success stories from ten of Australia's leading health and medical research teams, whose work has been funded by NHMRC. These conversations are representative of hundreds of highly successful and intenrational-standard projects funded each year by NHRMC. Please note these podcasts are large files and may take some time to download. in this series Associate Professors Marc Achen and Steven Stacker: Research: the...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 5:12pm

Professor Sally Davies

Professor Sally Davies is the Director General, Research and Development at the Department of Health, United Kingdom. She is responsible for implementing the 'Best Research for Best Health' strategy that was published in January 2006. Her expertise is in health services research. In this vodcast, she discusses the implementation of this strategy and future directions for research in the UK. Transcript (PDF, 103KB) Transcript (DOC, 48KB) Video file (Windows Media...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 5:11pm

Professor Elias Zerhouni

Professor Elias Zerhouni is the Director, National Institutes of Health, United States of America. He has been leading a change of agenda for the NIH and has developed a roadmap for research. In this vodcast he speaks about the future directions of the NIH and opportunities for collaboration. Transcript (PDF, 53KB) Transcript (DOC, 36KB) Video file (Windows Media Video, 19.5MB) Professor Elias Zerhouni: Thank you, and I want to really thank...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 5:09pm

Professor Edward Holmes

Professor Edward Holmes is the Executive Chairman, National Medical Research Council, Singapore. In this vodcast, he talks about the opportunities for collaboration in the Asia Pacific Region. Transcript (PDF, 50KB) Transcript (Word, 34KB) Vdeo file (Windows Media Video, 12.6MB) Professor Edward Holmes: Well, first of all g'day—is that the way you say it? Thank you, Warwick, for this invitation to visit Australia. I'll make a few...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 5:07pm

A conversation with Judith Whitworth

7 March 2008 Professor Judith Whitworth of the John Curtin School of Medical Research talks about her life’s work so far. » Download: Transcript (PDF, 41kb) » Download: Transcript (Word, 68kb) » Download the audio file (MP3, 25MB) » Download the audio file (MP3, 25MB) Voice-over: Welcome to the National...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 5:05pm

A conversation with Professor Doug Hilton

20 March 2008 Professor Doug Hilton of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne talks about identifying genes and treating genetic diseases. Transcript (PDF, 54KB) Transcript (Word, 82KB) Audio file (MP3, 28MB) Audio file (MP3, 28MB) Voice-over: Welcome to the National Health and Medical Research Council podcast series, a conversation with some of the great minds...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:56pm

A conversation with Professor John Hopper

3 April 2008 Professor John Hopper is a mathematician and statistician who went on to become a world leading researcher in genetic epidemiology. Professor Hopper’s current population-based studies look at genes and the environment together in breast cancer, bowel cancer and prostate cancer. In this conversation, Professor Hopper talks about the power of statistics and letting the data speak for itself. Transcript (PDF, 46KB)...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:54pm

A conversation with Professor Caroline McMillen

Professor McMillen is Pro Vice Chancellor and Vice President Research and Innovation at the University of South Australia. She is also the Director of the Research Laboratory for the Early Origins of Adult Health and heads a research group of about 15 staff and students. Her research focus is pregnancy and foetal development and the role that the nutritional environment, before conception and during the early stages of gestation, plays determining cardiovascular and metabolic health in later...

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A conversation with Professor Barry Marshall

Barry Marshall is Professor of Microbiology at the University of Western Australia. In 2005 Professor Marshall, along with his colleague Dr Robin Warren, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. In this conversation, Professor Marshall talks about growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, how he became interested in studying medicine, and the discovery of a germ that lives in the...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:52pm

A conversation with Professor Tony McMichael

Full version, 15 May 2008 Highlights version of this interview During the late 1980s it became increasingly clear to Professor McMichael that the emerging evidence of new, global and environmental changes — such as the then-controversial greenhouse effect — posed very real and significant risks to human health. In this conversation, Professor McMichael discusses the challenges he now faces: to understand better how climatic conditions affect human...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:46pm

A conversation with Professor Tony McMichael

Highlights version, 15 May 2008 Full version of this interview During the late 1980s it became increasingly clear to Professor McMichael that the emerging evidence of new, global and environmental changes — such as the then-controversial greenhouse effect — posed very real and significant risks to human health. In this conversation, Professor McMichael discusses the challenges he now faces: to understand better how climatic conditions affect...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:45pm

A conversation with Professor Wendy Hoy

Australia is working harder than ever to close the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. Professor Wendy Hoy, an Australia Fellow and director of the University of Queensland’s Centre for Chronic Disease, has spent many years researching chronic disease in indigenous populations, both in Australia and overseas. Here she talks about the root causes of poor health among Aboriginal people, and suggests practical ways we can solve the problems. Transcript (PDF, 25KB...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:44pm

A conversation with Professor Fiona Stanley

Can health and medical research contribute meaningfully to society while being commercially successful, personally satisfying, exciting and fun? Professor Fiona Stanley, founding director of the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, thinks it can. Here she explains how her Institute’s collaborative, multidisciplinary approach reaps financial benefits while making a difference to society’s problems. She also invites budding researchers to experience the immense satisfaction of working...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:43pm

A conversation with Professor Jane Hall

What’s an economist doing in health? Professor Jane Hall says it’s to ensure we get value for money from our scarce health-care resources. Professor Hall is the founding director of the Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation and a former member of the Academy of Social Sciences. In this podcast she gives her take on the issues facing Australia’s health-care industry. Transcript (PDF, 24KB) Transcript (Word, 45KB) Audio file (MP3, 11.5...

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A conversation with Professor Ian Frazer

The road to realising a medical breakthrough can be a long and bumpy ride, Professor Ian Frazer discovered, but finally reaching your destination can be immensely satisfying. Now the director of the Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine, Professor Frazer spent more than 20 years studying the human papilloma virus and developing the world’s first vaccine that helps prevent cervical cancer, Gardasil. In this podcast he tells Dr Mark Bradley about the twists and...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:42pm

Breakthrough discovery: naturally-occurring stem cells in women

Doctor Caroline Gargett 5 February 2009 Some years ago, Dr Caroline Gargett had what she thought was a ‘crazy idea’: take stem cells from the lining of a woman’s uterus, or endometrium, and engineer them into remedial tissue to treat pelvic organ prolapse, an all-too-common condition following childbirth. Here she explains to Dr Andi Horvath how she was spurred on by the breakthrough discovery that a woman’s endometrium, which regenerates every...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:41pm

We know fluoride saves teeth, but is it cost effective?

Professor Mike Morgan 19 February 2009 Despite being recognised as one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century, questions are still raised regarding the cost effectiveness of community water fluoridation. How much does the community actually save by putting in a fluoridation program? The answer, according to this research, is that the amount saved in terms of not having to go to the dentist, or have fillings, or crowns or...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:40pm

Finding better ways to treat traumatic injury

Doctor Belinda Gabbe 2 April 2009 Could traumatic injury outcomes be improved if we changed the way we manage the patients? Do some patients recover better than others after major trauma? If so, why? Looking for answers, former physiotherapist turned researcher Dr Belinda Gabbe and her team developed a methodology to evaluate, measure and record the recovery of patients with serious injury. In the process, they gave the survivors a voice and produced...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:39pm

Mysteries of male reproduction

Associate Professor Mark Hedger 15 April 2009 Why, unlike other organ transplants, are those involving a man’s testes protected from rejection by the immune system? And what causes this mysterious, privileged relationship between testicular cells and the immune response? Seeking answers, NHMRC Senior Research Fellow Mark Hedger and his team focused on the fact that fluids bathing the cells inside the testis were able to suppress the function of...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:38pm

Whose fault is obesity, mum’s or dad’s?

Professor Melissa Wake 1 May 2009 A study reported widely here and overseas discovered that a father’s parenting influences a child’s likelihood of becoming obese, but a mother’s parenting doesn’t. Using data from the major Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (Growing up in Australia), Professor Melissa Wake and her team created the first snapshot of how a child’s activity patterns, diet, parental characteristics, household income and other...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:37pm

Chinese medicine may hold the key to treating diabetes

Professor David James 14 May 2009 Researchers at the Garvan Institute in Sydney have teamed up with Shanghai’s scientific experts in Chinese medicines used for hundreds of years to treat diseases like Type 2 Diabetes. The goal of the Garvan team, led by Professor David James, is not to work with these medicines in the traditional sense, but to bring them into the modern-day world. And they have succeeded, identifying unique compounds in Chinese plants...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:36pm

Can cancers be prevented?

Professor Adele Green 28 May 2009 Why do some people get cancers and not others? Can some cancers be prevented as well as treated? If so, what mechanisms cause them and how can these be controlled? Seeking to better understand those questions, and find answers, medically-trained researcher Professor Adele Green and her team at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research investigated five cancers that pose serious, often fatal, health threats to...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:35pm

Osteoarthritis research gets closer to the bone

Professor Nick Fazzalari 11 June 2009 For more than half a century, osteoarthritis research has focused solely on cartilage. But that hasn’t delivered much benefit to most of the 1.6 million Australians who suffer the disease, with many still needing joint replacements. Now there’s a new approach. Realising they had to think laterally, Professor Nick Fazzalari and his team in Adelaide looked at other tissues associated with osteoarthritic joints...

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Thursday, 5 November 2009 - 4:34pm

'Flightless' protein helps heal wounds

Professor Allison Cowin 25 June 2009 Under normal conditions, our skin has amazing powers of healing. But in extreme cases such as traumatic or burns injuries, we often end up with horrific scarring, disfigurement or even disability. In trying to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in healing skin, Associate Professor Allison Cowin and her team at the Wound Healing Laboratory in Adelaide focused on a cytoskeletal protein called ‘...

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