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Fellowship Awards

This section of the site contains information about the sub funding types available under the NHMRC Fellowship Award funding type.

Fellowship Award types

The types of Fellowship Awards available are described below.

Research Fellowships

The purpose of the NHMRC Research Fellowships Scheme is to provide support for outstanding health and medical researchers to undertake research that is of major importance in its field and of significant benefit to Australian health and medical research.

Research Fellowships are open to all researchers in Australia who have a sustained track record of significant output as demonstrated in peer-reviewed literature, and a strong commitment to quality research outputs as judged relative to opportunity. 

Research Fellowships offered by the NHMRC are prestigious and highly competitive awards for high performing researchers. Recipients of Research Fellowships are generally in the top 10% of their field and are viewed as ‘pushing the boundaries’ of research.

Trans-Tasman Joint Initiative Award

The NHMRC and Health Research Council of New Zealand have established this award to foster the development of collaborative research initiatives between Australian and New Zealand health and medical researchers.

This award will provide $10,000 per annum in addition to the Research Fellowship Package to enable the recipient to establish research links with health and medical researchers in New Zealand.

Practitioner Fellowships

The Practitioner Fellowships Scheme provides support for active clinicians and public health or health services professionals to undertake research that is linked to their practice or policy. The Scheme is not intended to support academic researchers who may have clinical / public health responsibilities.

Practitioner Fellowships are open to all active clinicians and public health or health services professionals in Australia who have a sustained track record of significant research output as demonstrated in peer-reviewed literature, and a strong commitment to quality research outputs as judged relative to opportunity.

NHMRC expects applicants to plan to combine clinical / public health duties with their research, and be able to demonstrate that the research associated with the Practitioner Fellowship is designed to maximise the application or transfer of outputs into policy or practice.

Practitioner Fellowships offered by NHMRC are prestigious and highly competitive awards for high performing researchers.  Recipients of Practitioner Fellowships are generally performing in the top 10% of their field of research.

Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) Fellowships

The NHMRC TRIP Fellowship awards provide support and training for future leaders in translating important research findings into clinical practice. The award supports protected- time for clinicians in researching approaches to applying evidence to improve care, and develop the range of skills needed for leadership in research translation.

Fellows gain practical hands-on implementation experience by proposing and undertaking an implementation research project. This is supported through self-directed professional development in implementing evidence, researching and evaluating clinical translation strategies, influencing and managing change and communicating research findings. Fellows also receive mentoring to assist in the development of leadership and project management skills.

The two-year half-time award is open to early-to-mid career medical practitioners, nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other health professionals. It is expected that the Fellow’s employing institution will support the remainder of the Fellow’s time in a clinical role.

Sir Macfarlane Burnet Fellowships

The purpose of the NHMRC Sir Macfarlane Burnet Fellowship Scheme is to provide support to Australians who have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, to carry out high quality research to further advance Australia’s health and medical research capabilities. The Fellowship serves as a formal mechanism by which the NHMRC can acknowledge and draw on the unique talents of these outstanding researchers, enabling them to contribute to the achievement of the NHMRC’s strategic objectives, better health outcomes and the development of a more dynamic health and medical research sector.

Nobel Laureates for Physiology or Medicine will be invited to apply for the Sir Macfarlane Burnet Fellowship by NHMRC.  They will be required to complete and submit an application form as well as a five year research/work plan with clearly defined activities, objectives, outcomes and milestones, to the NHMRC.

Australia Fellowship

This Fellowship was designed to attract and retain leading health and medical researchers in Australia. It was aimed at outstanding health and medical researchers across all disciplines and consisted of a one line budget of $800,000 per annum for five years. Applications were invited from leading researchers both in Australia and around the world. Successful applicants have leading international status in their fields and are now conducting research programs of major impact and benefit to Australia.

The aims of the scheme were to:

  • support the most outstanding and creative health and/or medical researchers across the range of disciplines in biomedical, clinical, health services and public health research;
  • foster the expansion of the scale and scope of Australian health and medical research, including innovative research that is transformative and with high impact potential;
  • build excellent research teams in Australia, foster mentoring and collaboration and provide opportunities for talented researchers; and
  • undertake research that is of major importance, potentially high impact and of significant benefit to Australians.

After five rounds and the awarding of 39 Australia Fellowships, applications are no longer accepted for this scheme.

Page reviewed: 12 December, 2011